Investment Property Taxes Capital Gains – What Investors Should Know

If you’re a real estate investor looking at selling a property, or if you’re thinking of buying a property now and thinking long term about selling it, then you might be worried about what taxes you’ll incur. In this blog post you’ll read about investment property taxes capital gains – what investors should know about capital gains.

Before you read further, you should be aware that this information is provided in general to a wide range of readers – each person reading in a different area inside or outside of Connecticut and New York, perhaps with different corporate structures, any many other factors. So we’re providing a helpful overview but you should always talk to an accountant and tax attorney before making any final decisions for yourself.

Different Types Of Tax For Different Types Of Income

There are different types of tax for different types of income. For example, straight income that comes in from a job might be taxes as regular income at your regular tax rate. But other types of income may be taxed at a different tax rate. For a stock market investor, for example, income derived from dividends have their own tax rate. And for real estate investors, you should be aware that income derived from capital gains on the sale of a property has its own tax rate.

What Are Investment Property Taxes Capital Gains?

Let’s start back at the basics: When you buy a property, you pay a price; when you sell a property, you get what the next buyer pays you. The difference between the price you bought the property for and what you sold the property for is the capital gain. Let’s say you bought the property for $100,000 and you sold it for $125,000. The capital gain is $25,000 and this is the income that is taxed at the capital gain rate.

Why Do Capital Gains Have A Different Rate?

Capital gains tax rates are usually less than the rate you pay for your regular income. There are a couple of reasons why capital gains are taxed differently: one of the reasons is because the gain can be quite substantial on a piece of real estate so a normal tax rate can be quite prohibitive to pay, so a capital gains tax rate is like keeping extra money in your pocket. The other reason is because the government wanted to encourage the buying and selling of assets (which is good for the economy) so they provided an incentive (a lower rate) to do so.

Capital Gains On Investment Property Versus Your Primary Residence

You should be aware that capital gains on your residence (the house you live in) may be treated differently than other property you own. Some important factors include: whether you live in the house and for how long, or whether it’s a secondary property (such as a cottage) or an investment property such as a rental property. You should talk to a tax attorney about this because the situation will be different for everyone.

If you want to know more about real estate investment properties, or if you want to get introduced to a good tax attorney who can help you optimize your tax situation, click here to enter your information, or pick up the phone and call 800-523-4204.

About Jeffrey

Mr. Weiller has some 35 years of experience in the real estate and capital business which includes 100s of residential real estate investment deals putting deserving American families left behind by the mortgage crisis on a path to home ownership. Other experience includes secured financing deals ranging in size to $100 million, investment property sales, landlord representation, and tenant representation. Prior to forming NYCL. Up until the tragic events of September 11th, 2001, specialized in the World Trade Center submarket of New YorkCity and worked in the smoking aftermath helping surviving businesses relocate. Previously was business partner with one of the top dealmakers/leasing brokers in the country. Together completed many major transactions including: the sale of the Colgate Development Site in Jersey City, NJ, with 6 million square feet of development rights to Hartz Mountain/Leonard Stern, two 1 million sq. ft. leases with Prudential Securities and Paine Webber Securities for which entire office buildings were built and rebuilt around, the sale of 100,000 sq. ft. of air rights on Broadway to the Related Companies and represented VNU and Thomson Reuters Publishing, both major publishing companies, nationally in their multi-million square foot portfolios of real estate and has had daily dealings with major Manhattan and nationwide property owners and completed many tax lien foreclosures in New Jersey for his own account.

Get More Real Estate Market Info... Subscribe Below!

Learn more about us and find other resources on buying investment properties with us. Like us, follow us, connect!

Comments are closed.